End graft advice, please

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Ron Daves
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Joined: Sat Jan 07, 2012 7:39 pm
Location: Southern California Desert

End graft advice, please

Post by Ron Daves »

I just finished an end graft on a Concert Uke. I tried two mehods that didn't work, e.g., router and an edge guide affixed with double backed carpet tape and a jig that clamped to the bench. The carpet tape seemed a bit squiggly and the jig might have worked if I could have clamped the instrument down successfully. The other problem was that I couldn't see past the router base very well. This all made me nervous, so I chiseled out the edge graft recess. Clamping the instrument down was challenging, but I managed it. Still, getting a straight edge to hold still while I scored the sides just didn't work for me. I ended using a very sharp chisel and lightly tapped it to create the recess edges, then carved out the rest. Using a hammer on a stringed instrument is not a good idea, no matter how light you tap. I got it done, but there has to be an easier way.

Any advice?
Frustrated luthier wanna-be

Rodger Knox
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Re: End graft advice, please

Post by Rodger Knox »

If I understand you correctly, I've used a fretsaw to make those cuts.
I've also used a hobby knife, but that's more work than most people want to do.
A man hears what he wants to hear, and disreguards the rest. Paul Simon

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Pat Foster
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Re: End graft advice, please

Post by Pat Foster »

I use a small Japanese saw, also much like a fret saw. It cuts on the pull stroke, which for me makes it easier to get accurate results. For a guide, I use a cork-backed ruler, with the saw on the INSIDE of the line so that any slips will only damage wood that is to be removed. Hope this helps.

Pat
I like to start slow, then taper off.

Mario Proulx
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Re: End graft advice, please

Post by Mario Proulx »

Razor saw or sharp knife, and sharp chisel. End of story.

Jigs are for when you intend to make multiple identical items. Or to overcome a lack of skills.

Ron Daves
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Location: Southern California Desert

Re: End graft advice, please

Post by Ron Daves »

Okay, thanks. Razor knife and sharp chisel makes sense. I used sharp chisel and sharp chisel. Lots of work. I've used a router in the past, but that's scary.

Mario wrote: "Jigs are for when you intend to make multiple identical items. Or to overcome a lack of skills"

Clear and succinct...ouch
Frustrated luthier wanna-be

Michael Lewis
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Re: End graft advice, please

Post by Michael Lewis »

The way to make the job easier is to do it more often. Once you get used to using the tools and protecting the surrounding surfaces you will be more relaxed and efficient.

Simon Magennis
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Location: Menorca. Spain.

Re: End graft advice, please

Post by Simon Magennis »

Michael Lewis wrote:The way to make the job easier is to do it more often. Once you get used to using the tools and protecting the surrounding surfaces you will be more relaxed and efficient.
Tobias Berg, a German classical guitar maker, mentions here http://www.rodgers-tuning-machines.co.u ... uitar.html that while he was working with Lakewood guitars he did work on about 4500 instruments over 6 years. I sure he has the hang of things by now. :D

John Mueller
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Re: End graft advice, please

Post by John Mueller »

Mario Proulx wrote:Jigs are for when you intend to make multiple identical items. Or to overcome a lack of skills.
Lack of skill will make the jig fail as well.

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Tony Costa
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Re: End graft advice, please

Post by Tony Costa »

If you put some 120 or 220 grit sand paper on the back of the ruler, it will help prevent it from slipping while making your cuts. Cork is nice and wont damage the box, but the sand paper wont either unless you are sliding all over the place. Which you shouldn't because of the sand paper. Plus, this should be done before any finish prep has taken place.
PMoMC

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