invisible repair.

If you have a string instrument of any kind that needs fixing, a mistake you made in building a new instrument that you need to "disappear," or a question about the ethics of altering an older instrument, ask here. Please note that it will be much easier for us to help you decide on the best repair method if you post some pictures of the problem.
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Joe Williams
Posts: 23
Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2014 9:33 pm

invisible repair.

Post by Joe Williams »

I'm recycling an old piece of wood for a guitar top (lightly spalted Maple). From it's previous incarnation, there are 4 little (less than 1/8 inch) screw holes that there was no acceptable way to exclude. Who has the best method for patching them?

Steve Senseney
Posts: 673
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2012 2:45 pm

Re: invisible repair.

Post by Steve Senseney »

You can use a plug cutter (or cut with a chisel) and inlay intact wood into the holes.

You can place the holes in a place where hardware (pickups or controls) cover the defect.

You can place inlays of interesting wood design, or pearl into the materials.

If you use Hot hide glue, the glue lines will nearly disappear. Light colored maple may be the hardest wood to hide glue lines however.

Always practice on scrap first.

Joe Williams
Posts: 23
Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2014 9:33 pm

Re: invisible repair.

Post by Joe Williams »

Acoustic, so no hardware. Don't think it's a place where contrasting inlay makes much sense, but I'll think more about that.

John E Giarrizzo
Posts: 139
Joined: Sat Feb 04, 2012 10:17 am

Re: invisible repair.

Post by John E Giarrizzo »

Joe,

I know you said it is no place for contrasting inlay, but this is what I did for a piece of maple salvaged from a kitchen table that had screw holes in it. At first I thought of just plugging with a contasting wood, but didn't like it, so put an inlay in.

Not quite invisible, but maybe something to think about.
Jeg mimf1 100_3931.jpg
Jeg mimf2 100_4170.jpg
Jeg mimf3a dscn0202.jpg

Michael Lewis
Posts: 1467
Joined: Thu Jan 12, 2012 1:22 am
Location: Northern California USA
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Re: invisible repair.

Post by Michael Lewis »

Spalted maple for an acoustic guitar top? From a structural perspective there are much better candidates.

Mario Proulx
Posts: 821
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2012 12:08 pm

Re: invisible repair.

Post by Mario Proulx »

John, great job on the fiddle!

John E Giarrizzo
Posts: 139
Joined: Sat Feb 04, 2012 10:17 am

Re: invisible repair.

Post by John E Giarrizzo »

Thanks Mario.

Hopefully give Joe some ideas on using recycled material. Almost everything I build is from recycled or non-standard material.

Daryl Kosinski
Posts: 121
Joined: Sat Oct 12, 2013 11:14 am
Location: Fultonville, NY

Re: invisible repair.

Post by Daryl Kosinski »

How about ripping along the grain right through the hole jointing and regluing. No more holes and almost a grain match. A picture would be nice.

Another thought would be to countersink the hole, make a wood look alike flat head screw head, slotted or Philips, glue that in the hole, why hide it make it a feature. Or even cut off a brass screw and glue it in.

If someone asks why just say you were screwing around.

Steve Senseney
Posts: 673
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2012 2:45 pm

Re: invisible repair.

Post by Steve Senseney »

I love the inlay on the violin!

John E Giarrizzo
Posts: 139
Joined: Sat Feb 04, 2012 10:17 am

Re: invisible repair.

Post by John E Giarrizzo »

Thanks Steve.

Clay Schaeffer
Posts: 1381
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2012 12:04 pm

Re: invisible repair.

Post by Clay Schaeffer »

With a small carving tool you could gouge a small irregular shape, fill it with wood, and with creative use of a sharpie add some Faux spalting to camouflage the fill. Another possibility - You could cross cut some twigs and inlay them into the holes. they will appear to be small knots in the wood. I have done that to repair defects in furniture.
As small as they are, just leaving them might look as good as anything else. When I have bug holes in rosewood I just fill them with black epoxy (or not). They fade into the beauty of the wood.

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