A different look for maple fingerboards?

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gene downs
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Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2012 1:58 pm

A different look for maple fingerboards?

Post by gene downs »

Maple f'boards are about the only reasonably priced thing going. But that maple look doesn't work for every guitar, of course.

Has anyone experimented with stains and such on maple? Does anything look good?

Brent Tobin
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Re: A different look for maple fingerboards?

Post by Brent Tobin »

I have some parts from an old German luthier that were 'ebonized' maple. The look is pretty good but i'd be careful if I had to sand them.
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Barry Daniels
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Re: A different look for maple fingerboards?

Post by Barry Daniels »

Stain good. Dye too.
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Jim McConkey
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Re: A different look for maple fingerboards?

Post by Jim McConkey »

Lots of cheaper violins have white fretboards that have been ebonized. Check your favorite supplier for fingerboard stain. Relatively cheap!
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David King
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Re: A different look for maple fingerboards?

Post by David King »

You might look at wood that's a bit harder and more stable than maple if you can source it. Shagbark hickory, black locust, and iron wood are all pretty common in the Northeast. The Southwest has mesquite and the Northwest has mountain mahogany but that's getting pretty rare now. Midwest is all about Osage Orange if you are lucky.

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