Applying Danish Oil: What's your method?

TEST ON SCRAP FIRST! If your question is about repair work, either regluing or refinishing, please post it in our Repair Section.
Post Reply
User avatar
Hans Bezemer
Posts: 373
Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 1:01 am
Location: The Netherlands
Contact:

Applying Danish Oil: What's your method?

Post by Hans Bezemer »

I like using a Danish Oil finish because of the natural look and because it can be applied easily without a spraygun.

I've searched the internet for ways to apply Danish Oil on wood.
This search resulted in a wide variety of methods.
For a novice (like me), it's a bit overwelming.
What method should I try out?
Or are there just more ways that lead to Rome?


At this moment I'm trying two methods on pieces of scrap:
1. sanding the wood to 320 grid dry sandpaper and then apply one coat of danish oil, wipe het of after ten minutes and then the next layer I'll use 400 grid wet and dry sandpaper and wetsand the wood with some oil, wipe it of and repeat this step after a couple of hours with 500, 800, 1000 and 1200 grid.
2. (wet) sanding the wood until 1200 grid with water, let the piece dry and then apply a couple of coats of oil.

I'm curious about the method that others use.
Which steps do you take to get to a good finish?
Do you use different methods on different kind of woods?
Do you / can you buff the finish?
Do you apply an extra coat of shellac of epoxy on it?
Do you have a picture of the end result?

Hans

User avatar
G.S. Monroe
Posts: 105
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2013 10:50 am
Location: Lakeland, Florida
Contact:

Re: Applying Danish Oil: What's your method?

Post by G.S. Monroe »

I love Danish oil... it and hand rubbed shellac are my two preferred finishes.

1st) Wood prep... Sand with 120, 220, then 320 grit.
2nd) Burnish raw wood with fine steel wool.
3rd) Apply a quality Wood Conditioner (Minwax) to help avoid blotchy absorption issues.
4th) Apply Danish Oil with a clean cotton (lint free) rag. Wet rag with the Danish oil and wipe with the grain.
Let rest for a hour between coats. Apply 2-3 coats. Then wet sand with 400 grit and Danish Oil,
making a slurry that will fill pores and scratches. Wipe down with soft cotton cloth, wiping with the grain. Let dry Overnight.
6th) Apply 2-3 coats of Furniture wax, (I prefer Old English), and buff to a satin finish.

User avatar
Hans Bezemer
Posts: 373
Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 1:01 am
Location: The Netherlands
Contact:

Re: Applying Danish Oil: What's your method?

Post by Hans Bezemer »

Thanks Greg.

I've finished the to scap pieces and both some wax on both of them and they look nice.

Samuel Hartpence
Posts: 94
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 11:32 am

Re: Applying Danish Oil: What's your method?

Post by Samuel Hartpence »

G.S. Monroe wrote:I love Danish oil... it and hand rubbed shellac are my two preferred finishes.

1st) Wood prep... Sand with 120, 220, then 320 grit.
2nd) Burnish raw wood with fine steel wool.
3rd) Apply a quality Wood Conditioner (Minwax) to help avoid blotchy absorption issues.
4th) Apply Danish Oil with a clean cotton (lint free) rag. Wet rag with the Danish oil and wipe with the grain.
Let rest for a hour between coats. Apply 2-3 coats. Then wet sand with 400 grit and Danish Oil,
making a slurry that will fill pores and scratches. Wipe down with soft cotton cloth, wiping with the grain. Let dry Overnight.
6th) Apply 2-3 coats of Furniture wax, (I prefer Old English), and buff to a satin finish.
This reply intrigues me. My two upcoming finishing projects are a Cherry Tele and then a Pine-Beetle U-Bass. For the Cherry, would applying the wood conditioner help prevent/limit the blotchy finishes that can happen with oil-based finishes and Cherry? For the Pine, I assume I'll need some additional grain/pore filler. Do you have any recommendations for that, and would the finish let the blue 'beetle streaks' show through?

User avatar
G.S. Monroe
Posts: 105
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2013 10:50 am
Location: Lakeland, Florida
Contact:

Re: Applying Danish Oil: What's your method?

Post by G.S. Monroe »

Samuel Hartpence wrote: This reply intrigues me. My two upcoming finishing projects are a Cherry Tele and then a Pine-Beetle U-Bass. For the Cherry, would applying the wood conditioner help prevent/limit the blotchy finishes that can happen with oil-based finishes and Cherry? For the Pine, I assume I'll need some additional grain/pore filler. Do you have any recommendations for that, and would the finish let the blue 'beetle streaks' show through?
Sam, I definitely would recommend using a wood conditioner on any kind of wood prior to applying a stain or oil based finish. It serves two purposes, 1) It is made from penetrating oils that not only inhibit uneven or blotchy absorption, but helps to promote a deeper absorption into the wood. 2) It helps to seal the wood so it takes less oil to achieve results. I like wood conditioner so much that I apply it inside the acoustic chamber as well as on the outside of the instrument. Basically everywhere there is exposed wood get at least a coat of wood conditioner.

For pine or any "open pore" wood, I typically apply a sealer coat, and wet sand with 400 grit and your oil or shellac to fill pores. The beetle streaks will show through unless you do something to remove, cover, or mask them before hand.

Simon Magennis
Posts: 466
Joined: Sat Jan 07, 2012 7:51 am
Location: Menorca. Spain.

Re: Applying Danish Oil: What's your method?

Post by Simon Magennis »

What does a "wood conditioner" actually do? What is in it? Never heard of it before.
Thanks.

Post Reply