how to avoid fumbling the nut

Questions about tools and jigs you want to buy/build/modify.
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Bob Hammond
Posts: 629
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2012 4:13 pm

how to avoid fumbling the nut

Post by Bob Hammond »

Hello,

Have you ever dropped the arbor nut and flange washer down into your table saw? Well here's a little widget that relieves that frustration. It's a piece of springy wire that engages the dimple in the end of the arbor shaft, and catches/carries the nut & washer as you remove/replace them.

(For some reason, the post editor insists on placing the pics upside down in the preview, but if I click on the pic it turns right side up. Hmmm?)
Attachments
The wire carrying the nut & washer to/from the arbor.
The wire carrying the nut & washer to/from the arbor.
The wire, nut, and spacer
The wire, nut, and spacer
The wire is engaged in the dimple of the arbor, and pressed down to the table on the other side of the blade, so that the hole is not obstructed.
The wire is engaged in the dimple of the arbor, and pressed down to the table on the other side of the blade, so that the hole is not obstructed.

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Bob Gramann
Posts: 976
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2012 11:08 am
Location: Fredericksburg, VA
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Re: how to avoid fumbling the nut

Post by Bob Gramann »

Great idea! Many times I have gotten out the magnet on the end of the telescoping wand for that very purpose.

Bob Hammond
Posts: 629
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2012 4:13 pm

Re: how to avoid fumbling the nut

Post by Bob Hammond »

Oh, the Lady Wife saw me taking the pics for this post, and she suggested that I also show you my precision fence that I'm using to cut lock corner joints for tool drawers (left foreground). It's a folding/parallel wedge design with a 1:4 pitch. It translates a 1/32" displacement in the Y direction (fore/aft) into a 128th" displacement in the X (port/starboard) direction. It's so much easier than nudging the saw's fence a tiny amount, and it's very rigid.
Attachments
One piece is cut while flat on the table, and the mating piece is passed vertically over the blade.  Hence the featherboard in the picture to hold the vertical piece tight against the fence (instead of risking my fingers).
One piece is cut while flat on the table, and the mating piece is passed vertically over the blade. Hence the featherboard in the picture to hold the vertical piece tight against the fence (instead of risking my fingers).

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