light colored pencils

Questions about tools and jigs you want to buy/build/modify.
Post Reply
James Meloan
Posts: 13
Joined: Thu Jan 12, 2017 2:35 pm

light colored pencils

Post by James Meloan »

what pencils do you all use for marking your darker woods? Straining my eyes looking for the grey/black line on darker woods gets less fun as the years go on. I've tried a few varieties of colored pencils but none seem to mark that well on wood. Grease pencils are ok for labeling but not for marking a cut line (for me anyhow).

User avatar
Waddy Thomson
Posts: 270
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2012 8:11 pm
Location: Charlotte, NC

Re: light colored pencils

Post by Waddy Thomson »

Quilters pencils from sewing stores or big hobby stores like Hobby Lobby or Michaels. The lead is soft, but it's silver, and easy to see on dark woods. They sharpen best with hand sharpeners vs crank ones.

User avatar
Mark Swanson
Posts: 1974
Joined: Thu Jan 05, 2012 11:11 am
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan USA
Contact:

Re: light colored pencils

Post by Mark Swanson »

I have a pack of welding pencils from a welding equipment supplier. They are silver as well and sound like the same thing Waddy mentions.
  • Mark Swanson, guitarist, MIMForum Staff

Craig Bumgarner
Posts: 370
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 3:03 pm
Location: Drayden, Maryland

Re: light colored pencils

Post by Craig Bumgarner »

I use little bits of soapstone that welders use on steel.

Alan Carruth
Posts: 1012
Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2012 1:11 pm

Re: light colored pencils

Post by Alan Carruth »

Gel pens can work well, making a narrow line that shows up. Silver ones are pretty good, and seem fairly reliable. The main issue with them is that they rend to reflect the light mostly in one direction, which means it might not show up when you're sawing to a line on and band saw. White ones are even better, since they reflect in all directions, but they sometimes stop working for no apparent reason. All gel pens seem to work best on a 'high energy' surface; one that has been sanded or scraped recently.

I keep thinking that it would make sense to borrow a technique from machinists. They will color a surface with dye (a felt tip pen works, too), and then scratch lines in it to mark a cut line or center a hole. I suspect you could do the same by making a wide mark with a China marker and then scribing the real line on that. I haven't tried it yet, though.

Brian Evans
Posts: 901
Joined: Sat Aug 30, 2014 8:26 am
Location: Tatamagouche, Nova Scotia

Re: light colored pencils

Post by Brian Evans »

I have a marking knife that I use if I want any decent accuracy. I also use a plain pencil and manipulate a light to get it to shine for me.

David King
Posts: 2688
Joined: Sat Jan 07, 2012 10:01 pm
Location: Portland, OR
Contact:

Re: light colored pencils

Post by David King »

White watercolor pencils from your art store, the more you spend the better the pigment. I like the silver paint pens but had a bad experience with open grain woods like wenge soaking up pigment that couldn't get cleaned out later.

Kerry Werry
Posts: 60
Joined: Tue Apr 10, 2012 3:21 pm

Re: light colored pencils

Post by Kerry Werry »

I use welders pencils as well they are as said soft but work.. i also found some yellow 0.5mm mechanical pencil leads on Amazon..

Kerry
Mark Swanson wrote:I have a pack of welding pencils from a welding equipment supplier. They are silver as well and sound like the same thing Waddy mentions.

Joel Nowland
Posts: 83
Joined: Sat Jan 07, 2012 6:01 pm

Re: light colored pencils

Post by Joel Nowland »

James

I found these Sewline brand white ceramic leads for a mechanical pencil for fabric marking that work very well. They are a bit more brittle than standard leads.

Post Reply