Bridge for 5-String Electric Mandolin

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Bridge for 5-String Electric Mandolin

Postby Bill Weis » Sun Sep 23, 2018 5:41 pm

Hi all, I need a adjustable bridge/saddle for a 5-string electric mandolin. The bridge would be similar to a 4-string bridge offered at AllParts.com (link: https://www.allparts.com/MB-1508-010-El ... _2253.html). I have not been able to find a supplier by internet searches. Does anyone know of a supplier I could use? Thanks in advance.
Bill Weis
 
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Re: Bridge for 5-String Electric Mandolin

Postby Mark Wybierala » Thu Sep 27, 2018 11:44 pm

I haven't seen anything. I was hoping someone would reply to this with an answer for ya. I've now made quite a few electric mandolas and octave mandolins both as original builds and as guitar conversions. Its not difficult to make your own bridges, its just tedious. I usually avoid the bridge style you're showing because it takes a bit more effort and I also like to have a little more neck angle on my favorite builds. I'll usually make a stop tail piece or use a modified trapeze piece and then fabricate a one-piece length of brass or aluminum like what is called a bow-tie bridge on the original Les Paul guitars with offsets for intonation. The desired radius is cut and cannot be modified but the string height is adjusted via thumb wheels or nuts. Shown below is one of my brass telecaster bridges that I made years ago and never used. In principal it works just like the bridge you show and if I drilled six holes instead of the three, I could use saddles exactly like the ones on your bridge. This bridge is made to use three saddles. The base is from 1/8" thick brass from McMasterCarr. I purchased it in a 3" X 24" length. The upright in the rear is 1/4" X 1/2" bar stock secured to the base with two 4/40 stainless screws and CA. Understand that the screws are more than adequate because the bridge is designed to be used as a string-through with string ferrules on the back of the guitar. There is no string tension applied to the upright. The only strength required from the upright is to keep the saddles aligned and standing upright and in the correct intonation position via intonation screws. When I was building these, I used 1/4" round brass stock to make my traditional telecaster saddles. You got to have a drill press to get a good result. You also need a working set of calipers, an awl, a small machinists ruler, an autopunch helps and be prepared to spend a lot of time doing basic math and very accurate measurements. Working with the brass is wonderful. I use the ultra machinable 360 brass and never had reason to try anything else. I cut it with a hand saw, sometimes shape it with a belt sander using 120 to 240 grit belts, and then proceed up in sandpaper grits up to 600 to an eventual mirror finish using a dremel polishing wheel. The result can be spectacular and the best thing is that no matter how many years pass by, it will always be able to be polished again to a mirror finish unlike chrome or nickle plating. You can seal the polished result with lacquer if you want but I like the way it ages. If I haven't explained enough about this and you're interested, let me know.
Attachments
Brass bridge.png
Mark Wybierala
 
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Re: Bridge for 5-String Electric Mandolin

Postby Mark Wybierala » Thu Sep 27, 2018 11:58 pm

Here's another idea using brass. This is a six string guitar bridge from eBay that has been modified to be a mandola bridge on one of those 1/2 size electric guitars. There actually isn't any modification done to the bridge itself. I just made a one-piece saddle with 4/40 threaded holes to adjust height. The strings use a combination of the string-through holes and the remaining intonation screw adjustment holes. The saddle is a 1/4" X 3/16" length of brass bar stock. The rough radius was done on a belt sander and the rest was done using a dremel and cheap jewelers files, sanded and then polished.
Attachments
modified bridge.png
Mark Wybierala
 
Posts: 281
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Location: Central New Jersey

Re: Bridge for 5-String Electric Mandolin

Postby Greg Steil » Mon Oct 08, 2018 8:16 am

Maybe check on Cigar Box Nation? All sorts of unique bridges and stuff for CBG's etc. May find something there
Greg Steil
 
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Re: Bridge for 5-String Electric Mandolin

Postby Bob Francis » Mon Oct 08, 2018 10:24 pm

Bob Francis
 
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Re: Bridge for 5-String Electric Mandolin

Postby Andrew Jerman » Fri Oct 12, 2018 4:15 pm

I build them and sell them on my website. They are on the accessories page. http://www.crossroadswood.com If inappropriate to post my website address then I'll delete it.
Andrew Jerman
 
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Re: Bridge for 5-String Electric Mandolin

Postby Bob Francis » Sat Oct 13, 2018 1:25 pm

Beautiful work Andrew!
Bob Francis
 
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Re: Bridge for 5-String Electric Mandolin

Postby Andrew Jerman » Mon Oct 15, 2018 1:29 pm

Bob Francis wrote:Beautiful work Andrew!


Thanks. Not really rocket science but fortunate to have the resources and equipment to make them. I just hate the retail end of it. :)
Andrew Jerman
 
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Re: Bridge for 5-String Electric Mandolin

Postby Mark Wybierala » Tue Oct 16, 2018 11:24 am

Andrew, Brother by another mother.
Mark Wybierala
 
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Location: Central New Jersey


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